Some questions we often get asked about water…

What are some common home water problems?

While most homeowners may never encounter scary-sounding contaminants like toxaphene and trichloroethylene, there are several common water problems to be on the lookout for in the home:

  • Hard water
  • Iron water
  • Acid water
  • Turbidity
  • Taste and Odor
  • Contaminants

My water tastes fine. Why would I need a drinking water system?

Ordinary tap water can contain dissolved metals, such as iron or lead. It might contain chlorine, nitrates and mineral salts. Or it could have sulfates, mercury, asbestos or arsenic in it. A reverse osmosis water treatment system reduces more than 95% of dissolved solids, including many harmful contaminants.

The city treats my water so it’s safe to drink. What more do I need?

The quality of your home’s water may meet local standards, but it might not meet your own. Reverse osmosis drinking water purification systems are usually used in the kitchen, where you are most apt to get your drinking water, and where you prepare all of your food and beverages. You need the healthiest and best tasting water available. Also, the methods used to treat municipal water – including chlorine – could be impacting the smell and taste of your mixed beverages and your cooking. A drinking water system provides bottled water quality, without the bottled water price paid at the store and at the recycling center.

How does a water softener operate?

One of the biggest misconceptions about water softeners is that the salt is what softens your water. What actually softens the water are the thousands of resin beads inside your softener that filter out hard water minerals. Water softeners use a negatively charged ion exchange resin to collect the impurities from your water. The resin becomes charged when it mixes with a sodium or potassium solution. The salt in the water softener isn’t what softens the water; it is what enables the resin to collect and remove the hardness from your water. And while the unit is softening your water, it also removes the chlorine taste and odor, which is often a result of water treated by cities and municipalities. “Regeneration” is the term for when the resin is being cleaned and recharged in the sodium solution.

Why does soft water make my skin feel slippery?

A water softener system removes the impurities in your water so your skin is rinsed without hard water minerals left behind. There is no residue on your skin to trap traces of soap, dead skin cells and other particles. And no residue left behind that dries your skin. The slippery, softness you feel is exactly how clean skin is supposed to feel. The same way that soft water eliminates water spots that dry onto your glassware and silverware, it allows your bath soaps to lather better and rinse off completely. Soaps will lather better and you’ll be able to use half as much.

My water feels too soft. Can I adjust it?

No. Soft water is soft water. You cannot adjust the level of impurities being removed from the water.

I live in the city. Since they treat the water, does that mean my water is already soft?

Most municipalities treat water by using chlorine to kill bacteria. Some might even soften the water, but only to meet minimum requirements. That doesn’t mean it is ideal for your family.

Can I treat my well water?

Short Answer: “Yes”. During our free in-home inspection, we will evaluate your water and recommend a water softener system or whole home filtration systems that are customized to treat your home’s water, whether it comes from your well or your municipality. The benefits include:

  • Reduced scale build-up on pipes, faucets and water-using appliances, providing energy savings.
  • Reduced iron stains, tastes and odors.
  • Cleaner, brighter laundry.
  • Lower use of soaps and detergents, saving money.
  • Eliminated spots on glassware and silverware.
  • Softer skin and hair.

What is the right system for my water problems?

The right product for your home is determined by testing your water, considering how many people are living in your home, understanding your normal water usage, taking into account the number of bathrooms you have, understanding the water-using appliances in your home, etc.

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